What does the Latest IPCC Report Say about Health Impacts from Climate Change?

Climate Change 2014: Impacts, Adaptation, and Vulnerability (44 page pdf, IPCC WGII AR5 Summary for Policymakers, Mar. 31, 2014)

Also discussed here: Climate Change: Health Impacts and Opportunities – A Summary and Discussion of the IPCC Working Group 2 Report (19 page pdf, The Global Climate and Health Alliance, Apr. 3, 2014)

And here: Climate change: yes, it’s getting worse fast and it matters (Dianne Saxe, Environmental Law and Litigation, Mar. 31, 2014)

And here: Global warming dials up our risks, UN report says (CBC news, Mar. 31, 2014)

Today we review the recently released report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and its Working Group that deals with impacts, adaptation and vulnerability. With high confidence, the report notes that climate change for the next few decades will cause existing health impacts to get worse until by the end of the century for some times of the year and some parts of the world “projected to compromise normal human activities, including growing food or working outdoors”. There are similar assessments of the risks facing other sectors of society and in various regions in other ways but clearly the time for action was yesterday.

health cl change and cities

To see Key Quotes and Links to key reports about this post, click HERE

How are Swedish Cities Planning to Adapt to Climatic Change Extremes?

Planning for Climatic Extremes and Variability: A Review of Swedish Municipalities’ Adaptation Responses(27 page pdf, Christine Wamsler and Ebba Brink, Sustainability, Mar. 14, 2014)

Today we focus our attention on Sweden, one of few countries in the world which is on track to become carbon neutral within this decade. The journal article under review looks at how Swedish cities approach the other side of climatic change- adapting to impacts, both natural and anthropogenic, using physical, economic and socio-economic measures. While there is little top-down direction at the national level beyond the provision of tools such as the Klimatanpassningsportalen on the internet to share practices and approaches, within cities top-down is the rule, leaving little for individual initiative but reflecting the local differences among the cities across Sweden.

local city role impacts

To see Key Quotes and Links to key reports about this post, click HERE

Marketing the Environment

Amanda Little

Amanda Little (Photo credit: ChimpLearnGood)

Want everyone else to buy into environmentalism? Never say “Earth”(Heather Smith, Grist, Mar. 12, 2014)

Also discussed here: No, we’re not “environmentalists.” It’s more complicated than that (Samantha Larson, Grist, Mar. 7, 2014)

Today we review a report from a source we rarely do- an environmental activist organization, Grist. The article looks at the question of why the public at large is so slow to accept and act on the alarm bells that are rung so loudly by the activists.

The answer seems to lie in several things:

  • failure to budget enough for communications (as opposed to fund raising and membership drives)
  •  failure to relate the environmental issue to people’s lives
  • failure to explain and keep the description of the issue simple
  • failure to repeat the message line enough until it reaches the public
  • *failure to adjust to the common sense outlook of millennials

Bottom line is to stop using the terms, such as “the environment” and “sustainable development”, and to start appealing to what makes sense to the man or woman on the street. Stop talking about “air quality” and start talking about how commuting to work by car harms the health of everyone enroute- and by how much.

To see Key Quotes and Links to key reports about this post, click HERE

Enhanced by Zemanta

Modelling Cities According to Isobenefits

Simulating future societies in Isobenefit Cities: Social isobenefit scenarios(16 page pdf, Luca D’Acci, Futures Journal, Sep. 25, 2013)

Today we review a paper about a model of various urban forms that are evaluated according to the benefits that each confers to its citizens. The forms include a traditional Central Business District form where the population and economy is highest in the centre and radiates outward to a second form where there are several sub centres or sub cities of activity to a third form where there is a ring city surrounding .The isolines of benefits (isobenefits) are based on formulae which estimate such things as benefits to pedestrians and cyclists (pedestrian and bike paths for example) and specific examples from cities around the world are tested. Results indicate the types of cities that could be designed as well as what might be done to existing cities to improve benefits. The optimum one seems to be a multi-centre city.

isobenefits

To see Key Quotes and Links to key reports about this post, click HERE

Are the Winter Olympics at Risk because of Global Climate Warming?

The Future of the Winter Olympics in a Warmer World(8 page pdf, Daniel Scott, Robert Steiger, Michelle Rutty, Peter Johnson, University of Waterloo, Jan. 22, 2014)

Also discussed here: Climate Change threatens Winter Olympics(University of Waterloo, Jan. 22, 2014)

And here: Climate change could see Winter Olympics melt away, warns new study(Robert Myles, All Voices, Jan. 28, 2014)

We review today an article which examined the climates of the 20 cities that have hosted the Winter Olympics over the last 90 years, finding that only 10 would qualify by 2050 and 6 by the end of this century because of global climate warming and despite advances in technology. Indicators used in the analysis included the capability of maintaining a 30 cm snow base for skiing (60 cm is better) and the number of rainy days, both an issue at the Vancouver Olympics in 2008. Of course, the public and its political leaders could wake up before then and reduce carbon emissions, 80% of which occur in cities addicted to cars.
winter olympics and cl ch

To see Key Quotes and Links to key reports about this post, click  HERE

How do they Measure Resilience to Climate Change Disasters?

Measuring psychological resilience to disasters: are evidence-based indicators – an achievable goal?  (20 page pdf, Jose Manuel Rodriguez-Llanes, Femke Vos, Debarati Guha-Sapir, Environmental Health , Dec. 20, 2013)

Today we review the ways that resilience can be measured and in particular, psychological resilience, based on a literature review of this factor in various scenarios and disasters. Unlike many climate impact studies this research looks at human behavior and how humans react to events that present challenges. Results indicate not surprisingly that social support increased resilience, in general, while women showed a larger risk of lower psychological resilience following a disaster. These findings would be important in disaster planning especially with the higher risk of larger and larger disasters expected with the greater variability of wind, temperature and precipitation extremes from climate change.

Reduction of flood and associated extreme weat...

Reduction of flood and associated extreme weather costs is the primary benefit of climate change mitigation. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

To see Key Quotes and Links to key reports about this post, click HERE

A Plan to Reduce the Impact of Air Pollution by 37% in 15 Years!

English: Constituency for the European Parliam...

English: Constituency for the European Parliament election in 2009 Español: Mapa por el Elecciones al Parlamento Europeo de 2009 Français : Circonscriptions aux élections européennes en 2009 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

A Clean Air Programme for Europe (11 page pdf, Communication from the Commission to the European Parliament, the Council, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions , European Commission, Dec. 18, 2013)
Also discussed here: London told to cut air pollution by 2020 – or face fines – European commission tells London and other European cities to dramatically reduce ‘invisible killer’ vehicle emissions (John Vidal, the guardian, Dec. 18, 2013)

Today we review a new package of measures announced by the European Commission which would improve air quality by reducing vehicle emissions such as nitrogen oxide by over 70% and produce economic savings of 40 to 140 billion EU in health benefits alone. The measures include revised short term targets, and stricter emission targets for the six main pollutants and reduced emissions from medium size utilities such as energy plants.

To see Key Quotes and Links to key reports about this post, click HERE

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 206 other followers

%d bloggers like this: